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, a cardinal in the roman catholic faith is someone you would say immediately is the belief style of religion, but you're so right, susanna, that all the styles were embodied in that man, and he was certainly a seeker. in fact, i had a wonderful conversation with martin marty, who that he had a chance to meet the great religious people of the world - the dalai lama, the pope, other great religious leaders - and he said that every one, they go so deeply into their own tradition, that they can find connection with other traditions. and our swami that we'll meet in the next class is exactly like that also, because he sees all religious paths as leading to a similar summit. not everybody agrees with that, yeah, you want to follow-up, susanna? >> well, i was just going to say, truly, you may have hit on it, that the deeper you go, the more you recognize. and his roots were down, and you could see there were other ones there, sort of mixing in with yours, but there is a connection. >> i love the root comment, and we want to stay with the root comment here in your beautiful piece you read to us. and
. but watch again. it's fascinating - a world away in terms of religion. we've got hinduism, for our monist mysticism, we might have heard something or will hear something from original peoples, first national peoples, native americans. now we're going through the coptic orthodox faith, and two folks in this roll-in, both equally astute. one is brother mark, who used to be, i believe, a dentist or some kind of professional field, and he gave that up in order to go to this monastery, where he lives his life, and a life of meditation and prayer and connection with god. bishop thomas, on the other hand, is a major bishop in the coptic faith in egypt, but listen particularly, because we've had barbara's beautiful sahara - once again, we're getting too many synchronicities in this class. we have this book - from the library, folks; that's why you can't see the front on it - but we have this book about the sahara - we'll, we're going to the sahara; i forgot about that. yeah, we're going back to the sahara, and listen to what life would be like there. and so, if we could, let's go to st. macarius
that politics and religion should never be discussed in polite conversation. but the united methodist church is doing just that -- discussing whether to change church doctrine added in 1972 that declares homosexuality incompatible with christianity.
of that is that i am not arguing for morality, from religion, or from tradition. none of my arguments presuppose anything about the moral status of gay relationships. there are lots of valuable relationships that do not get recognized as marriage by anybody. that cannot be the decisive factor. they do not rely on any particular religious tradition. if they did, it would still leave something to be desired because something i will defend today has been common to religions across time and many cultures. we would still want to ask the question of what common feature was motivating those theologies rather than the other way around. and i am not arguing that because it has always been this way it always should be. another thing is that my argument cannot be answered by appeals to equality. we usually think that this is the right response when we think of the marriage debate as a debate about whether to expand or restrict a pool of people elible for marriage. it is true that from that perspective it looks like marriage is a good thing and should be available on an equa basis. i think that this debate
, the religion of a people. from my perspective, the economy of a group is one of the most powerful determinants of human behavior. keach: to archaeologists, all economies fall somewhere on a spectrum from simple to complex. in a simple economy, people grow or gather all the food they eat. they make all the things they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items
by their religion, their skin color, their financial status or anything like that, but to accept them for who they are. i'm guilty of having what i like to call the small town complex. coming from a small town, i've got it. but it's where you think your world's only this big and that's how it is because that's what you were taught. i'm 24, and i know that's not the case anymore. but really, i mean, we always do that. we as humans are so fast to judge one another without really getting to know one another for what they are. so i definitely think it's something we could all take, take to and listen to. so anyways, we were stationed in northeastern afghanistan in a place called as jr. man, it's in the kunar province right on the pakistan border. and this is where i would be stationed with lieutenant john sovereign, gunnier is cent -- expubl and doc leighton. doc leighton was a navy corpsman, but they might as well be marines, so i'm going to cull him a -- call him a marine from here on out. [applause] so part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and getting to develop our team. becau
religion. people are rational. that's not quite true. religious lines in the middle east are critical. i think that once iran goes nuclear, we're going to have a severe sunni-shiite play, and it's seen as a shiite's bomb threatening the sunni dominance in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that, a pakistani nuclear presence, an extended, and pakistan nigh extended tee -- deterrents in saudi arabia. they financed the nuclear program. they have prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this is going to raise the question regarding, for the first time, second strike capability against india which would complicate the south asian complex. eases cay collation -- escalation risk is higher than ever between the two super powers. it's command and control. we have to address the question of how command and control of nuclear weapons are -- influences deterrents. first of all, questions of custody. in the united s
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7